Buckeye Dairy News: VOLUME 23, ISSUE 2

  1. April F. White, Graduate Student, Department of Animal Sciences, The Ohio State University

    Milk prices

    In the last issue, the Class III futures for January and February were at $16.12/cwt and $15.56/cwt, respectively. Class III closed at $15.75/cwt in December, with protein maintaining lower than in the winter issues at $2.98/lb and milk fat at about half of that at $1.44/lb. The Class III future for March is $16.18/cwt, followed by an increase to $17.20/cwt in April.

  2. Dianne Shoemaker, Dairy Farm Management Field Specialist, Ohio State University Extension

    The cost of raising a ton of corn silage, like the cost of producing a hundredweight of milk, varies across farms and years. For example, in 2019 the 33 Ohio Farm Business Analysis corn silage enterprises reported an average yield of 18.8 ton/acre, but yields ranged from 10 to 25 ton/acre. Yields directly impact cost of production and subsequently feed costs. 

  3. Chris Zoller, Tuscarawas County Extension Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources, Ohio State University Extension

  4. Jason Hartschuh, Extension Educator, Crawford County, Agriculture and Natural Resources, Ohio State University Extension

    March is one of the most challenging months on the farm to keep barns properly ventilated. We often see temperatures in the teens and less than a week later see highs in the 70’s. Our ventilation system recently roared to life as temperatures in the barn crossed 65°F, reminding me that we still had not gotten around to winter fan maintenance as belts squealed and louvers hung half shut.

  5. Dr. Mark Sulc, Professor and Extension Forage Specialist, Department of Horticulture and Crop Science and Jason Hartschuh, Extension Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources, Crawford County, Ohio State University Extension

  6. Dr. Mark Sulc, Professor and Extension Forage Specialist, Department of Horticulture and Crop Science and Jason Hartschuh, Extension Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources, Crawford County, Ohio State University Extension

  7. Allen Gahler, Extension Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources, Sandusky County, Ohio State University Extension

    Creating half-blood bull calves with sexed beef bull semen can increase profitability on the dairy farm. By some estimates, fed cattle that include dairy genetics make up something in the neighborhood of 25% of the U.S. beef supply. With improvements in the utilization of male-sexed beef bull semen, many dairy farmers are choosing to utilize beef genetics to add value to their calf crop.

  8. Garth Ruff, Beef Field Specialist, Ohio State University Extension

    Dairy producers over the past few years have faced a variety of challenges: low milk prices, increased feed costs, and often a surplus of heifers to enter the herd. In an effort to manage heifer numbers and add value to bull calves, breeding dairy cows to beef sires has become a more popular and common practice than ever before.